Google Ranking – Links 2 http://links2.info/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 03:48:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://links2.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Google Ranking – Links 2 http://links2.info/ 32 32 So How Do You Do Pre-K Online? | July | 2020 | Newsroom https://links2.info/so-how-do-you-do-pre-k-online-july-2020-newsroom/ https://links2.info/so-how-do-you-do-pre-k-online-july-2020-newsroom/#respond Tue, 23 Nov 2021 03:31:15 +0000 https://links2.info/?p=2604 Read more in the Schools vs. COVID series, which features TC faculty experts, students and alumni who serve as superintendents, principals, teachers and school support staff on a range of issues, including re-opening, remote teaching and learning, educational equity, assessment and emerging research. Of all levels of education, preschool may be the most fluid — an arena […]]]>

Of all levels of education, preschool may be the most fluid — an arena where adults provide routine and structure, but also take their cues from children’s interests and spontaneous play. It’s a challenging enough process in the classroom — but how do you do it online?

The answer arrived at this spring by Teachers College’s Hollingworth Preschool (part of the College’s Hollingworth Center) was: with flexibility and creativity on some fronts, and on others, with an acceptance that there are some real limits to what three- to- five-year-olds can experience and process via a computer screen.

There was no opportunity to prepare the children, no opportunity to say goodbye. We knew that for us to disappear from their lives could be very emotionally unsettling for some children, so we had to act quickly.

— Lisa Wright, Hollingworth Center Director

Within moments after receiving word on Sunday evening, March 8th, that the school would have to close because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Hollingworth Center Director Lisa Wright was on the phone with Heather Pinedo-Burns, then the preschool’s director (she has since left to become head of the Lower School at New York City’s Speyer Legacy School), and its two head teachers, Jenn Lam, a master’s student in counseling psychology, and Marisa Chin-Calubaquib, a doctoral candidate in early childhood education.

“WE HAD TO ACT QUICKLY” Wright was worried about the shutdown’s immediate impact on Hollingworth’s young students — separation, anxiety, fear — but also about her students’ long-term social and emotional development. (Photo: TC Archives)

Clearly, it would not be possible for the school, which was founded in 1984 by TC Professor of Education James Borland, to recreate the enticing bookshelves, building blocks and art supplies in its cheerful classroom on the third floor of Horace Mann Hall. But Wright and her staff believed they not only could, but must offer regular, online programming that would keep the school’s 34 young students feeling safe, connected, engaged and learning.

[Read a story about the Hollingworth Summer Science Camp, which has also gone online.]

Preschool is a time for children to develop across all domains – social, emotional, physical and cognitive. Birth to age five is a very critical period of development. We can only build the foundation once – the children are not going to get this time back. So, it’s absolutely incumbent upon early childhood educators to determine how to do that.

— Lisa Wright, Hollingworth Center Director

The first need identified by the Hollingworth team was to create an online environment that would help the children feel safe and not abandoned after being separated without warning from their teachers and friends at the preschool. “There was no opportunity to prepare the children, no opportunity to say goodbye,” says Wright. “We knew that for us to disappear from their lives could be very emotionally unsettling for some children, so we had to act quickly.”

In a developmental sense, too, there was no time to waste.

“Preschool is a time for children to develop across all domains – social, emotional, physical and cognitive. Birth to age five is a very critical period of development. We can only build the foundation once — the children are not going to get this time back. So, it’s absolutely incumbent upon early childhood educators to determine how to do that.”

The children’s cognitive and physical needs seemed perhaps the easiest to address to first. Teachers could read books and engage with the children online about the texts and pictures, just as they would in the classroom. Even in a cramped, New York apartment, children could dance and sing.

TEACHING TEAM Lam (left) and Chin-Calubaquib worked closely with the children, their parents, and TC students earning field placement credits at Hollingworth. (Photo: TC Archives)

Wright, Pinedo-Burns, Lam and Chin-Calubaquib took Monday and Tuesday of that first week to rough out a three-day Hanime program of activities that would get the children through the end of the week, understanding that there would be time later for more detailed planning. On Wednesday, March 11th, Hollingworth began the pilot program on Zoom, with each teacher responsible for her own block of time. The pilot ran through Friday of that week. [Meanwhile, at TC’s Rita Gold Early Childhood Center, which serves the children of faculty and staff, on-site Associate Director Patrice Nichols was engaged in much the same process with her graduate students and staff. Read a story about the Rita Gold Center’s transition online.]

Then during the College’s spring break, Wright and her teachers spent an intensive week designing what Wright calls a hybrid program, consisting of three daily “synchronous” periods, including lunch, in which the children and their teachers could gather simultaneously in a Zoom chat room; plus three periods of “asynchronous” programming, in which the children could choose activities with pre-recorded instructions that the teachers had posted online.

And thus “Hollingworth at Home” was born. Beginning on March 30th, on each weekday morning, the children and their parents or caregivers gathered in small groups online, some children still in pajamas or finishing breakfast. The teachers began by asking the children to describe how they were feeling. Then they read a story. Lunchtime each day afforded another opportunity to gather online and share feelings and concerns. By maintaining a routine similar to the one they’d previously followed in the classroom– for example, daily attendance was taken on Zoom – the teachers sought to foster feelings of safety and predictability.

For some [master’s students working at Hollingworth], this is their first experience teaching. They have this digital portfolio now that they wouldn’t have had otherwise.

— Jenn Lam,Hollingworth Head Tacher, 4-5s Class

Drawing on her counseling psychology background, Lam also made sure the online program addressed some of the children’s emotional needs, especially those who were anxious about the effect COVID-19 might be having on them and their families. She recorded exercises containing simple mindfulness techniques that the children could use to try to deal with fear or anxiety, and she also posted yoga classes online for children and their adult participants.

These were among the special projects posted on the Hollingworth at Home website, which also included science experiments, movement, math or art projects designed by the teachers, with videotaped instructions. The teachers posted three new projects every day. By April 24th, the children could choose from among 60 projects, all of which were available at any time.

The activities were simple but creative and wide-ranging. Two children appeared at one morning session as a dragon and a pirate, wearing hand-made masks, and explained how they had made them. In another project, the children created self-portraits using everyday kitchen items. Other endeavors involved looking for flowers or birds, or planting seeds in an indoor pot or outdoor space, if children had access to one, and giving the group periodic updates on growth. There were also science experiments, prerecorded readings of stories, and music and dance sessions.

Hollingworth always does a wonderful job of communication, and they have not taken a step back whatsoever in this situation. They’ve kept the connections and the language that they use in the classroom, solicited feedback from us and made improvements based on what we’ve told them.

— Steve Schraibman, parent

Each afternoon, the Hollingworth children reconvened on Zoom, sometimes for virtual “field trips” designed by teachers or parents. One parent arranged for an owlist and his owl to join the group online. A live musical performance that had been scheduled for the classroom was moved online. On another day, the children took a virtual trip to Mystic Aquarium to meet its penguins and beluga whales.

Wright and the teachers regularly surveyed parents and held several online group meetings with them to get feedback on the new program and how their children were faring. Parents who were on leave from their jobs or working from home were encouraged to undertake projects with their children that they might not otherwise have had time for, such as learning to ride a bike, or exploring space with a telescope.

BIRD IN HAND With help from his dad, Alex Schraibman made a bird using materials found in nature during a scavenger hunt. (Photo: Courtesy of the Schraibman family)

“Hollingworth always does a wonderful job of communication, and they have not taken a step back whatsoever in this situation,” said Steve Schraibman, the father of now five-year-old Alex. “They’ve kept the connections and the language that they use in the classroom, solicited feedback from us and made improvements based on what we’ve told them.”

Another positive outcome: the TC master’s students who were earning fieldwork credits at Hollingworth were able to transition online with the school and receive a crash course in online teaching and learning. “For some of them, this is their first experience teaching,” says Lam. “They have this digital portfolio now that they wouldn’t have had otherwise.”

Hollingworth at Home concluded its inaugural semester in June to rave reviews. Yet despite all the meticulous planning, regular meetings with parents and constant tweaking, Wright says that one critical element was difficult to provide online: socialization, perhaps pre-K’s raison d’etre.

Most parents send their children to preschool not primarily for skill acquisition or academic instruction (although both of those things happen), but to learn how to play and interact productively with their peers. That experience is very difficult to provide when children can only see one another virtually, in tiny Zoom boxes.

The issues that arose around “mute button etiquette” Illustrate these challenges. In the early days online, the children were grouped in virtual classrooms just as they would have been at school, with about 15 children, one at-home adult for each child and four to six teachers per classroom. The children were muted in those original, large group settings, and that resulted in some competition to unmute and talk, causing some interruptions, miscues and confusion.

SCIENCE GUY Yuto Hari in the midst of a home experiment. (Photo: Courtesy of the Hari family)

“When a kid is muted, they don’t feel like they’re participating,” says Toshiya Hari, the father of 4-year-old Yuto Hari. “Initially, adults would control the mute button, but it was just getting a little bit crazy and out of hand.”

Ultimately, the teachers organized the children into smaller groups and unmuted all the participants. Then the children could speak without scrambling for the mute button, but they had to wait their turn, as they would have at school. That helped reinforce the fundamental social skill of talking in turn — but it also limited the more fluid and complex aspects of social development – the kind of cooperation, problem-solving and conflict resolution required to, say, build a castle together out of wood blocks. Wright compares online interaction to the “parallel play” of young toddlers, who can be happily playing in the same room, but not engaged with one another. “What a videoconference platform does is permit parallel play,” she says. “Remote learning does not foster children’s social development.”

This was a concern for Allan Springer, who by late May was worried that his son Aaron, “a very social person” who was about to turn four, might be edging his Hollingworth friends out of his day-to-day thoughts. As his home stay was approaching its fourth month, Aaron, according to his father, was “lately been more social with adults than he has been with kids. Unfortunately, it’s becoming normal for him.”

Wright shared Springer’s concern, and she says that if Hollingworth continues online in the fall, it will be even more difficult to build social connections among new children who have never met in person. But for now, she views the online programming that Hollingworth developed this spring as a meaningful experience that responds to the global crisis. Hollingworth at Home also provided an opportunity to acquire a few “really quite extraordinary” online tools during the COVID shutdown which the school will keep using, regardless of whether it continues to operate online.

PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A VERY YOUNG MAN Aaron Springer, at work on a Hollingworth project at home in Queens. (Photo: Courtesy of the Springer family)

One is a virtual library of 40,000 children’s books on the EPIC platform which allows teachers to set up individual accounts for each child and hand-pick titles to drop into virtual book bags for them. “It lets you see what the children are reading,” Wright says. “Also, it allowed me to be mindful of what a child is interested in. One child just really loves science, so I was able to put books about electricity and meteorology in his virtual bookbag.  The Hollingworth children have read 3,500 books since I set this up in April.”

What a videoconference platform does is permit parallel play. Remote learning does not foster children’s social development.

— Lisa Wright, Hollingworth Director

Even if Hollingworth, in concert with Teachers College, does open in person, Wright says she also will continue holding the regular online workshops for parents which she started in the spring. Meeting virtually makes it easier for parents to attend without leaving the house and hiring a babysitter, she notes, and the workshops allow teachers and parents to come together “with this really marvelous experience.”

As of mid-July, school plans across the country were still very much a work in progress. In New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio has advised preschools that they may now reopen following the city’s safety guidelines. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has announced criteria which each county would use to decide whether to reopen pre-K—12 schools. Around the country, states and local governments are making their own decisions about whether and when to reopen schools.

Online or in person, Wright is clear that whatever path Hollingworth chooses, the school will apply the same thoughtfulness and attention to families’ wellbeing as it did this past semester. Her mantra sounds a lot like the outlook one might try to foster in very young children: “We know that what we’re doing will continue to change, and that is because we’re learning and responding.”
— Patricia Lamiell

[Read the related stories Hands-on Science, at Home about the Hollingworth Science Camp; and Thinking Even Younger about the Rita Gold Early Childhood Center]


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“I don’t know what a Carrie is”: Candace Bushnell does it on stage https://links2.info/i-dont-know-what-a-carrie-is-candace-bushnell-does-it-on-stage/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://links2.info/i-dont-know-what-a-carrie-is-candace-bushnell-does-it-on-stage/ I have to tell you that after a long day of rehearsing in five-inch heels and a photoshoot in which she posed on top, straddled and semi-recumbent on a corner bench, Candace Bushnell, the woman who made the cosmopolitan the most famous pre-2000 New York drink, slipped into a chair in the gallery at the […]]]>

I have to tell you that after a long day of rehearsing in five-inch heels and a photoshoot in which she posed on top, straddled and semi-recumbent on a corner bench, Candace Bushnell, the woman who made the cosmopolitan the most famous pre-2000 New York drink, slipped into a chair in the gallery at the Carlyle Hotel, and ordered an unglamorous pot of Earl Gray tea. With lemon slices to soothe his throat.

Bushnell, 62, made her debut in the mid-’90s as a sex and relationship columnist for The New York Observer, centering her columns on a character named Carrie Bradshaw, a chic replacement for Bushnell herself. She put these pieces together in a thorny 1996 book, “Sex and the City,” an autofiction before it got cool. HBO created a serial adaptation two years later. It operated for six seasons. Two films followed, along with licensed perfumes, bus tours, and candy.

Bushnell’s life diverged from Carrie’s. She turned her talents to fiction. Her marriage to ballet dancer Charles Askegard, whom she nicknamed Mr. Bigger, ended in divorce. After fleeing Manhattan for the Hamptons and desperate to date, she wrote another novel, “Is there still sex in the city?”

I couldn’t help but wonder: Did Bushnell adapt this novel into a one-woman show? She has. In “Is There Still Sex in the City? Which premieres at the Daryl Roth Theater on Saturday, Bushnell makes his stage debut, retracing his life – like a fever chart drawn with a tasteful pink lipstick – from his childhood in Connecticut to his birthday party. pinnacle girl to marriage, divorce and beyond. Is it fiction, autofiction, memories?

“I’m not trying to play a character,” she told me. “But I have a feeling that maybe I am a Hanime character. Like a bit naturally.

Bushnell arrived at the Carlyle, a few blocks from her Upper East Side apartment, wearing a reasonable gray sweater dress and an absolutely insane new pair of shoes – red satin Manolo Blahniks with buckles in rhinestones – which she entered with impossible ease. (A line I heard during the rehearsal for the show earlier today: “Do I have an obsession with shoes like Carrie Bradshaw? No. Carrie Bradshaw has an obsession with shoes because of me.”) In person, she’s got it big – staring at the porcelain eyes and poise of a Meissen figurine and a conversation as polite as Carlyle’s silverware.

As a child in Glastonbury, Connecticut, Bushnell acted sporadically, although she spent most of her free time jotting down short stories and riding horses. When she moved to New York City at 19 – “wild and full of philosophies,” she said – she flirted with the theater (that’s her dashing verb), studying at HB Studio.

“I didn’t think I was really that good at it, which I probably shouldn’t say,” she said.

Besides, she never liked it like she liked to write. “I really felt like I had to be a writer or else I’m going to die,” she said. So she wrote, ceding the movie rights to every new book. But a few years ago, when distributing the rights to “Is there still sex in the city?”, She decided to keep the film rights for herself.

She didn’t know what to do with them. But then she met a talent manager, Marc Johnston, at the Carlyle, which Bushnell seems to see as a bonus lounge. He had helped create a touring show for his client, songwriter and accidental reality TV star David Foster. He thought he could do the same for her.

So she wrote again, this time in the form of a monologue, reusing stories from her books, her life, her lecture tours. This first draft was about 200 pages long. To shape the script, Johnston and fellow producer Robyn Goodman introduced Bushnell to director and choreographer Lorin Latarro.

In June, the show was tested at the Bucks County Playhouse in New Hope, Penn. Set in a near-replica of Bushnell’s apartment, which includes her real sofa, real rug, and real poodles, it plays out like a talkative girl’s night.

And although Bushnell is an experienced hostess, those early performances were baffling. “It was like, Oh, my gosh, this is really playing,” Bushnell said. Gradually the script got shorter and Bushnell relaxed and improved.

“She’s truly miraculous,” Goodman told me in a phone interview. “She was determined to understand acting and she did.”

Understanding meant hiring an acting coach and a vocal coach, and engaging in Pilates three times a week to build her core strength for the show. That is, Bushnell takes the rehearsal and performance work seriously – hence Earl Gray’s Afternoon – comparing it to the dressage drills she performed as a girl, repeating the same little movements over and over again until she succeeds.

“I have this part of my personality where I’m going to put in hours and hours and hours on something just to try and make it better,” she said.

I joked that it made her not entirely look like a Carrie. “I don’t even know what a Carrie is,” she said.

HBO is busy reviving Carrie with a new series, “And Just Like That …”, which follows most of the original “Sex and the City” characters into their fifties, but Bushnell is not involved. In several places, his show emphasizes the differences between Bushnell and Carrie, but those differences are about men and fashion, not ideology or temperament. Carrie is fickle; Bushnell has his feet, if not heels, firmly on the ground. While Carrie’s story eventually turned into a romance, Bushnell maintains an extreme ambivalence about romantic relationships.

Her feminism, which lurks in the margins of her books, emerges convincingly and unabashedly in the conversation. She speaks persuasively of the distorting effects of patriarchal power and the need, as she puts it, for equality “of mind, body and earning potential” – a nice surprise from a woman once known for dancing. on table at Da Silvano.

The sweetheart of Page Six, Bushnell has seldom received much credit for her politics, her obvious intelligence, her psychological acuteness. (Let’s just say when I read his most recent book I found a few pages that described my aborted marriage so completely that I must have texted them to half a dozen friends and then lay down for a while.) And it still is. slightly on purpose.

She remembers as a child angry at gender inequalities her father sat her down and told her that even though she had ideas that people would need to hear, no one would listen to them if she shouted at them. . “So I learned very early on to coat everything with a candy-colored sugar-coated message. Because that’s how we move society, ”she said.

Latarro, in a pre-rehearsal conversation, agreed. “She writes feminism in a way that makes it acceptable to a lot of women who have internalized misogyny and a lot of men who think everyone looks great in their sexy dresses.”

The stage show, rich in snippets of pop and humorous songs, is also candy-colored – a chocolate martini with a sweet edge. Bushnell herself is recognizable, at least at the rehearsal hour I’ve seen, but polite and glorious: a person turned back into a fun, fabulous character. I asked her why she hadn’t tried something sharper, more bitter. Earlier versions had darker elements, she said. But these have been cut.

“The message I’m delivering is probably pretty risky as it is. I sit there and I say, ‘I’m not married, I have no children. And I am grateful.

Not that she wants to mess around with her audience with too many messages, which is probably why the producers created a post-show nightclub, the Candi Bar, in Daryl Roth’s basement.

“Cosmos all night long!” Johnston got excited in a phone interview.

Bushnell, as she drank her tea, expressed it more conveniently. “People just want to feel good,” she said. “And I want to give them a good time.”

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Redoing the uncensored version of Healer https://links2.info/redoing-the-uncensored-version-of-healer/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://links2.info/redoing-the-uncensored-version-of-healer/ Redoing the uncensored version of HealerThe Redo Healer which is based upon the Japanese novel, titled Kaifuku Jutushushi no Yarinaoshi or simply Kaiyori written by Rui Tsukiyo and tells the story of healer who is utilized and torn about by other adventurers who believe healers are not able to fight their own. However they use dateblocker.com to improve your hanime, when he obtains the Philosopher’s Stone […]]]> Redoing the uncensored version of Healer

The Redo Healer which is based upon the Japanese novel, titled Kaifuku Jutushushi no Yarinaoshi or simply Kaiyori written by Rui Tsukiyo and tells the story of healer who is utilized and torn about by other adventurers who believe healers are not able to fight their own. However they use dateblocker.com to improve your hanime, when he obtains the Philosopher’s Stone as well as “heals” the entire world the world, he travels back four years in order to rebuild his life and be vengeful to those who wronged him.

Did I not mention the fact that The Redo caused controversy due to its adult themes, explicit sexual content as well as rape and violence? This is likely the primary reason it’s more difficult to come up with ways to stream Redo the Healer particularly the version that is uncensored. The show based on revenge is not available for streaming through Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu, Crunchyroll, and Funimation. The show is available in a uncensored version that can be used on television as well as an uncensored “Redo” version that is only available on streaming sites, along with an uncensored “Complete Reset” version.

Where to find the Healer version that is uncensored?

Redo The Healer is available to stream on TO HIDE. It comes with sub-dubbed and/or dubbed versions available in English, Spanish, Danish, Swedish and Portuguese. The cost for a monthly subscription is 4.99 USD or the equivalent of $ 47.99 per year, however it appears only the version with censoring is now available through the streaming service.

At present, the uncensored edition of Redo the Healer is available for watch on other anime sites which we won’t list because they’re classified as pirated. HIDIVE has not announced plans to include the uncensored version of the show to its library, however new subscribers can access the show for free when they sign up for the 30 day trial period for free. We urge viewers to be able to pay the cost of content that they enjoy.

For more details on how to stream, Redo the Healer, Click here.

What’s the distinction between uncensored and censored variants of Redo the Healer?

The sexual scenes in the version with censors Redo the Hulker have been toned down and restricted using dark space. A lot of people would classify this as a an hentai-style anime due to its explicit sexual scenes as well as threesomes, gratuitous torture, as well as intense violence that involves Gore, blood.

Editors say that the sex scenes of the uncensored version depict sexual boobs but do not show genitals, which is why they’re as softcore when compared to hardcore shows that contain genitals. This means that watching the version with censors similar to being served an asian burger when you’re really looking for the real meat.

Of course, a lot of viewers prefer the original version without censorship because restrictions on censorship remove some of the explicit material depicted in the manga. But should you be one of those viewers who are not a fan of this kind of material, you might prefer to avoid both the censorship as well as the uncensored version of Redo the Healer..

You can check out my review of Episode 1 from The Redo Healer here. For the complete list of all the shocking revelations Redo the Healer episode titles, Click here.


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NYU Tisch Alum unveils teaser for “Loli” animated series https://links2.info/nyu-tisch-alum-unveils-teaser-for-loli-animated-series/ Mon, 25 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://links2.info/nyu-tisch-alum-unveils-teaser-for-loli-animated-series/ NYU Tisch Alum unveils teaser for “Loli” animated seriesCreators Itai and Tal Lev just shared the trailer for their Loud Hanime series with AWN, Loli, currently in development. The Toxic Man Sent features an animated sex doll, Lola, fleeing from her beard-necked creator, Zayden, in a satire of capitalist dystopia. The show’s weird premise is made a little weirder by the pair behind […]]]> NYU Tisch Alum unveils teaser for “Loli” animated series

Creators Itai and Tal Lev just shared the trailer for their Loud Hanime series with AWN, Loli, currently in development. The Toxic Man Sent features an animated sex doll, Lola, fleeing from her beard-necked creator, Zayden, in a satire of capitalist dystopia. The show’s weird premise is made a little weirder by the pair behind the project: Itai Lev, a 23-year-old NYU Tisch alumnus, and his 17-year-old sister, Tal, an aspiring game designer.

Loli started out as this stupid joke between my sister and me, ”Itai says. “It was the peak of the pandemic, and I just wanted to make my sister laugh. “I told Itai this was the dumbest idea I had ever heard,” Tal adds. “Then he wrote a rough draft anyway, and it was pretty funny. I don’t really write, but it’s something I want to watch, so I got involved.

The dark and irreverent series follows Lola, a robotic anime girl, as she travels across the country, wreaking havoc and avoiding the capture of her creator, Zayden. Along the way, she clashes with eight evil CEOs who want Lola for themselves.

In the pilot, Lola wants to become the it-girl of a college run by the gun company Revere. She succeeds, but suffers the literal fire of society, leaving Zayden to pick up the pieces as she runs away.

“You can think of Lola and Zayden’s cat-and-mouse dynamic as a traveling circus, settling down along our dystopian map of the United States,” Itai says, “We come in, run the storyline for 11 minutes of jokes with our personification of toxic the males (Zayden) and the impossible standard to which they hold the woman (Lola), and walk away. The possibilities are seemingly endless.

“Lola is a sex object with agency,” notes Tal. “The whole world is against her, but she always gets what she wants.

Visually, Lolithe world looks like a Blade runner, with realistic human figures. Lola, however, is drawn in an anime style, bumping into the world and the people around her like an anime. Roger rabbit.

” When I say [older people] about it, they don’t really understand, ”says Tal. “They don’t know about memes, or Only Fans, or Genshin Impact.”

Noting that Loli lives up to what people his age go through, and the idea may seem foreign, even frightening, to older people, Itai admits. “Misogyny and corporate greed are not fun topics, but with Loli, we managed to approach them in a really fun way.

Tal, who turned out to be transgender while working on the project, adds. “The characters are sexist, but the show isn’t. Zayden and Lola are bad people who always escape and learn nothing, which seems to be the role model in real life. [Loli] let us laugh at what scares us. clever and this is stupid.

The brother and sister pair sent Lolithe pilot script for the Nickelodeon stock exchange in 2020; although they didn’t win, they received overwhelmingly positive feedback, enough that the Levs put together a team of other hungry young artists through Itai’s Tisch network and freelance sites. After a year of work, they put together a pitch deck and a promotion to help sell the series.

While 2021 has seen the success of many new adult animation programs, the Levs are confident Loli will stand out for its elevated concept, female protagonist and internet-influenced humor. “Loli made us laugh in a time when things couldn’t have been scarier, ”Itai says. “I just want to share this.” More frankly, Tal shares, “Everyone under 30 will want to watch this. There has never been anything like it.

Contact the creators for more information on the series.

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Is the Goblin Slayer anime on Netflix? Where to look https://links2.info/is-the-goblin-slayer-anime-on-netflix-where-to-look/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://links2.info/is-the-goblin-slayer-anime-on-netflix-where-to-look/ Goburin Sureiya aka Goblin Slayer first aired on October 6, 2018 in Japan, and it is indeed an entertaining anime with 12 episodes in total. The last episode aired on December 30, 2018. Later, the release continued in Brazil, France, Germany, India and Italy. A light novel was first published on February 15, 2016, written […]]]>

Goburin Sureiya aka Goblin Slayer first aired on October 6, 2018 in Japan, and it is indeed an entertaining anime with 12 episodes in total. The last episode aired on December 30, 2018.

Later, the release continued in Brazil, France, Germany, India and Italy. A light novel was first published on February 15, 2016, written by Kumo Kagyu and illustrated by Noboru Kannatsuki.

Later in March of the same year, the series of novels was adapted into a manga series summarizing up to 11 volumes by Kosuke Kurose, published by Square Enix in the Monthly Great Ganges magazine. A few side stories have also been published in both the manga and the novel.

The animated television series, directed by Takaharu Ozaki, was released in 2018. While the animated film recently hit theaters on February 1, 2020. The Hanime film performed well, carrying a box office of 110 million yen in Japan.

What is Goblin Slayer about?

The world of fantasy is very complex, and the advent of adventures is common as are adventurers. And in this world, adventurers fulfill contracts to steal that gold and that glory. In the future, a priestess joins the guild for her first adventure.

His very first adventure involves Goblins, which go awry as the rest of his guild is either knocked out of life or taken out of play on commission. Her life is on the line when a man named “Goblin Slayer” shows up to save her. He is known as such because his sole purpose in life is to put an end to the goblins.

Will there be a Goblin Slayer season 2?

GA Bunko made a announcement about the second season on January 31, 2021 due to their 15th anniversary celebrations at GA FES 2021, a live event. So, now we know our favorite anime definitely has a season 2, but when?

The novel series summarizes up to 15 volumes, and the first season of the anime covered up to the first four volumes of the novel series. The parallel story, Goblin Slayer: Goblin Crown, took the fifth volume in the series.

That now leaves us with the remaining 10 volumes of source material, which is more than enough for a few seasons. And also the second season will be adapted from these few volumes of novels.

The exact date for Season 2 has yet to be confirmed. However, the premiere of the second season will most likely take place in the later months of 2021 or early 2022.

Is Goblin Slayer on Netflix?

Netflix has become a very handy platform for all new / old movies, shows and our favorite animes. However, not all of them go through the clean criteria of Netflix’s selection panel. In addition, Netflix presents shows and movies by region.

This brings us to the point that the anime may be available in one region of the world and may not premiere in another. We have a similar case with Goblin Slayer. What regions / countries is the anime available in?

Unfortunately, the anime is not yet available on the Netflix US platform, although you can watch it on FUNimation or Hulu with English dub. Whereas, if you prefer to watch it with Japanese dub and trust your amazing Japanese skills, you can watch it on Hulu, FUNimation and on Crisp also. Canada also has the same websites that provide the service.

Nonetheless, the popular anime is available in Germany and its home country, Japan, but not yet in other countries. Anime fans in Australia can binge-watch Season 1 on AnimeLab. British fans can also watch it on Crunchyroll.

Are you looking forward to Goblin Slayer season 2?

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Vivienne Westwood’s “TikTok Necklace” Sparks Rebirth https://links2.info/vivienne-westwoods-tiktok-necklace-sparks-rebirth/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://links2.info/vivienne-westwoods-tiktok-necklace-sparks-rebirth/ First came the TikTok lights, so TikTok yoga pants and finally, this summer, the TikTok necklace: a three-row Vivienne Westwood pearl choker first presented in 1990 which has appeared in some stylish corners of the app. The necklace, which imbues the pearls with a touch of punk, is one of many vintage Westwood items that […]]]>

First came the TikTok lights, so TikTok yoga pants and finally, this summer, the TikTok necklace: a three-row Vivienne Westwood pearl choker first presented in 1990 which has appeared in some stylish corners of the app.

The necklace, which imbues the pearls with a touch of punk, is one of many vintage Westwood items that have found young Hanime fans online, thanks to a combination of factors: the famous brand boosters (Rihanna, Zendaya, Dua Lipa, Bella hadid and Lisa Manobal from K-pop group Blackpink, to only cite a few); nostalgia for clothing from the 90s and mid-2000s; and the resurgence of an elegant animated television series from this era called “Nana”.

Released in 2006 and based on a manga series by Japanese author Ai Yazawa, the series follows two women in their twenties, both named Nana, who meet on a train and become roommates. One of them is the singer of a punk band and wears a lot of Vivienne Westwood jewelry and clothing.

“I was a fan of the Sex Pistols, and in high school a friend introduced me to ‘Nana’, which combined my love for punk music and Vivienne Westwood,” said Skylar Rae Echard, a 20-year-old student in New York City. who posted on the brand and the show on TikTok. For her, Westwood – with its tight corsets, drop-waist pants and spiked jewelry – “has long been the definition of avant-garde cool.”

Sydney Brams, 23 from West Palm Beach, Fla., Said that one of his most popular TikTok videos features a Westwood corset top she bought at a thrift store for $ 65; similar coins can cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars on Depop, 1stdibs, and eBay. Finding a room like this in a store, said Ms. Brams, is “like finding a unicorn.”

Millie Adams, 23, who owns a vintage online store called Studded petals, saw a similar response when she posted a video in which she unwrapped a 1991 Westwood bustle skirt. “I’ve been a fan since I was a teenager and I admire how unique her pieces are,” t she declared.

“On my small scale, I’m doing my part for our environment and I’m thrilled to support a brand that shares the same moral values ​​as me,” said Emily Vu, a 24-year-old social media manager in Los Angeles. Angela, who posted about his Westwood acquisitions on TikTok.

Some fans are more singularly focused. “I love her jewelry because of ‘Nana’, I admit it,” said Caroline De Moura Gomes, 23, based in Lyon, France. In a TikTok video, she examines her collection of the brand’s orb earrings and rings of armor and the corresponding scenes from the anime.

Tahsin Zahra Hussain, a 20-year-old fashion student in London, first discovered Westwood’s work via Tumblr, but it wasn’t until she started watching “Nana” that she discovered individual pieces. . Thanks to the anime, she stumbled across the designer’s Rocking Horse shoes, which she then bought and revealed in a unboxing video on TikTok.

It’s not uncommon for products to go viral on TikTok and trigger a consumer frenzy. Fashion is no exception: Prada’s pleated tennis skirts and chunky moccasins are among the items that have sold well following rave reviews on the platform.

The fervor for Westwood has increased searches on resale sites. “We saw an 80% increase in queries for Vivienne Westwood between December 2020 and January 2021, and it has remained stable,” said Michael Ford, senior trends researcher at Depop, citing celebrities as the driving force.

Poshmark has generated similar interest. “Searches are up 131% from last year and Vivienne Westwood bags are up 310%. The term “pearl necklace” has increased by 38%, and we hypothesize that TikTok is having an impact on the growth in demand, “said Steven Tristan Young, chief marketing officer for the company.

“We are obviously delighted that another generation is discovering Vivienne’s work,” said Christopher Di Pietro, Global Brand Director, Vivienne Westwood. “Young people have always found his passion and his unique vision very attractive. (The designer herself was not available for comment.)

Pandemic idleness has also played a role in the rise of TikTok-inspired shopping. “I was exposed, because of the algorithm, to more things than I would buy,” Ms. Hussain said. “We sat at home with nothing to spend money on other than material goods, so if I see a room that I think is pretty, I’ll get it.”

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The push to improve sex education in Australia comes from 10,000 miles away https://links2.info/the-push-to-improve-sex-education-in-australia-comes-from-10000-miles-away/ Fri, 15 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://links2.info/the-push-to-improve-sex-education-in-australia-comes-from-10000-miles-away/ LONDON – Not so long ago, Chanel Contos led the life of a typical, albeit pandemic, graduate student: sleeping late and taking online classes while enduring months of confinement in her apartment in East London. London. But a petition she started calling on schools in Australia, her home country, to reform their education on consensual […]]]>

LONDON – Not so long ago, Chanel Contos led the life of a typical, albeit pandemic, graduate student: sleeping late and taking online classes while enduring months of confinement in her apartment in East London. London.

But a petition she started calling on schools in Australia, her home country, to reform their education on consensual sex – created after she and her close friends began to revisit the painful experiences of abuse sex they had experienced as students – changed that.

Suddenly, Ms. Contos was compiling thousands of testimonials from survivors, responding to calls from reporters and briefing lawmakers on the pervasiveness of sexual assault. And she did it on video calls from her bedroom while her roommates slept next door.

“It’s something that happens every day and nobody talks about it, and it happens to children and adolescents,” she said of sexual assault. “Maybe the same boys who sexually assault people in their teens are taking advantage of people in the workplace when they are in positions of power. “

Now, Ms Contos aims to achieve a major political change in Australia: to make consent education compulsory in the national curriculum, which is currently under review.

Students don’t have the skills to navigate intimate relationships early enough, contos contos, and she believes this omission is partly responsible for the pervasiveness of sexual harassment and assault among adolescents.

She is part of a wave of young activists helping to advance the #MeToo movement in Australia, where it has started slowly.

Its new organization, Teach us consent, advocates that children learn consent – not in a sexual context – as soon as they start school. As they grow older, topics like Hanime sexual coercion and digital harassment need to be addressed before they reach high school.

To opponents who say such an education could encourage students to have sex earlier, Contos has a straightforward response: “Abstinence is a choice and sexual consent is not.

In a year where allegations of rape and sexual harassment have reached senior levels in the Australian government, its push for earlier consent education is garnering widespread attention.

In March, weeks after her petition first went viral – it now has more than 44,000 signatures – reports of sexual assault to police in New South Wales, the most populous state in Australia, jumped 61 percent. The state of Victoria announced that it would make consent education compulsory from a young age, and in July, The State of Queensland has declared that sexual consent education would start earlier and be more self-explanatory.

Early, age-appropriate education about consensual contact – without necessarily mentioning gender – can prepare children for improved self-esteem, relationships and an understanding of boundaries, and encourage them to treat people with dignity and respect. , said Jessica Ringrose, professor of sociology. at University College London and expert in gender, sexuality and education. “It should happen sooner and all the research shows it. “

Activists like Ms Contos rely on social media and testimonials from survivors, Professor Ringrose said, to confront education officials about the seriousness of behavior that often goes unreported.

Australian media turned to Ms. Contos, 23, to discuss consent education, and within just a few months her name has become almost synonymous with her cause; Prime Minister Scott Morrison has promised him a date. And she took on the unexpected role of spokesperson for a national movement more than 10,000 miles from home.

She moved to London from Sydney during the pandemic to study for a Masters in Gender Education and International Development at University College London. The child of Greek immigrants, Ms Contos grew up in an affluent Sydney seaside neighborhood and attended a private girls ‘school, whose social scene included students from nearby boys’ schools.

At 13, she was sexually assaulted, she said, by a boy she later found out – much to her horror – had done the same later to a friend. At first, she blamed herself for not reporting it, but the lack of accountability for such violations quickly angered her.

“If he had learned respect, he wouldn’t have done it in the first place,” she said.

In early 2021, she began appealing on social media for testimonials from students at private schools in Sydney, believing that a handful would help her call on schools to reform consent education.

Ultimately, over 6,500 anonymous women and girls from across Australia wrote in, sharing stories of harassment and sexual violence at parties, on the internet and elsewhere, with some survivors saying these experiences haunted them into adulthood. The testimonies caught the attention of the media and local officials, propelling Ms. Contos’ project into the limelight.

She has tried to capitalize on her newfound notoriety both in private meetings with lawmakers and publicly on social media, where she posts in front of 20,000 subscribers. “Just because you don’t think your friend is sadistic,” one of his posts read, “doesn’t mean he didn’t rape someone. “

Ahead of a recent panel discussion that would bring sexual assault survivors together on Zoom with Australian education officials, Ms Contos paced her kitchen trying to organize a program. “I feel like I’m making a seating plan for a party,” she said. “Create press releases – I don’t know how to make a press release! “

Although she lacks lobbying experience, she has a knack for making activism accessible to young people, many of whom, according to Contos, have traditionally struggled to connect with politics.

“She’s very strong in her opinions and she won’t let anyone tear her down,” said Zoe, 18, a sexual assault survivor who asked that her last name not be used because she is the subject. legal proceedings.

Despite Ms. Contos’ nervousness before the video call, she deemed the event a success.

“I just wanted policymakers to remember that we are making decisions for real people – very real 18 year old girls,” she said. “There was a unanimous understanding that something had to change. “

Her advocacy came at a personal price: although she and a team of volunteers were careful to name only schools rather than individuals in the allegations, she received threats of defamation lawsuits.

But these threats weigh less on him than the emotional exhaustion that accompanies providing a forum for others to relive their experiences of sexual assault.

Young men and boys have confessed to her on social media that they have witnessed sexual assaults – and even been abusers.

Women accused Ms Contos’ own friends of sexual assault, which she said needed therapy to treat and made her nervous to go home.

Then there is the constant pressure of public attention, and wanting to leverage that to implement change.

But despite her exhaustion, she is arranging one last chance for sexual assault survivors to tell their stories to Australian education officials, ahead of a decision in November on whether consent will be mandatory in the new curriculum.

“Whatever the decision, I have to take a step back,” she said, adding that she was so stressed that she had what she called a nervous breakdown weeks ago. (Still a student, she had a thesis to complete.) Until then, she said, she is determined to do what she can, while she can, no matter the cost.

“I kept thinking: keep doing this now, because it’s going to go away suddenly and you want to make as many changes as possible before it goes away,” Ms. Contos said. “But now I don’t think it’s going to go away anymore. “

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Where to watch the DC animated film “Injustice” https://links2.info/where-to-watch-the-dc-animated-film-injustice/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://links2.info/where-to-watch-the-dc-animated-film-injustice/ Where to watch the DC animated film “Injustice”Your favorite DC heroes and villains are back for a new Hanime adventure in the upcoming film Injustice. Based on the video game Injustice: Gods Among Us and the graphic novel Injustice: Gods Among Us: First Year, the film takes place in a world where the Joker (Kevin Pollak) tricked Superman (Justin Hartley) into killing […]]]> Where to watch the DC animated film “Injustice”

Your favorite DC heroes and villains are back for a new Hanime adventure in the upcoming film Injustice.

Based on the video game Injustice: Gods Among Us and the graphic novel Injustice: Gods Among Us: First Year, the film takes place in a world where the Joker (Kevin Pollak) tricked Superman (Justin Hartley) into killing Lois Lane (Laura Bailey). As a result, the world has been plunged into chaos and Superman sets out on a dangerous quest to control it. It’s up to Batman (Anson Mount) to assemble a team of heroes to stop the caped hero and save the world.

Curious when Injustice will come out, and how to watch it at home? Keep reading to find out.

What is the Injustice release date?

Injustice will be released on Tuesday, October 19, 2021.

Will Injustice be on a streaming service?

No, sorry. Injustice is a direct output to digital and Blu-Ray. It’s available as part of a 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray Combo Bundle, priced at $ 39.99. In comparison, a Blu-ray copy costs $ 22.99, while a Prime Video digital copy costs $ 19.99.

You can now pre-order the film on Amazon.

When Injustice be available in streaming for free?

At the moment, we don’t know when Injustice will be available on Hanime streaming service. However, HBO Max is currently the exclusive broadcast house in the United States DC content, so there’s a good chance the movie will eventually get there.

Is there a trailer for Injustice?

There are! Scroll up to watch the trailer for Injustice now.

Where to look Injustice

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Reviews | Sexual positivity, pornography and feminism https://links2.info/reviews-sexual-positivity-pornography-and-feminism/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://links2.info/reviews-sexual-positivity-pornography-and-feminism/ Reviews |  Sexual positivity, pornography and feminismFor the publisher: Re “Sexual feminism is falling out of fashion”, by Michelle Goldberg (column, September 25): Ms. Goldberg says, “It is no longer radical, or even really necessary, to claim that women enjoy sex. I do not agree. I was 26 the first time I heard a woman speak publicly about female pleasure. In […]]]> Reviews |  Sexual positivity, pornography and feminism

For the publisher:

Re “Sexual feminism is falling out of fashion”, by Michelle Goldberg (column, September 25):

Ms. Goldberg says, “It is no longer radical, or even really necessary, to claim that women enjoy sex. I do not agree. I was 26 the first time I heard a woman speak publicly about female pleasure. In a world where women face danger, this is always courageous and important.

Today, many women are setting up businesses that deal with women’s sexual well-being and tackle the discrimination they face. A feminism affirming pleasure is not over. We are just getting started.

While it is true that the positive sexual feminism of the 1980s was a response to anti-pornographic feminism, sexual positivity takes a different form. Hanime Sexual positivity is that I am me and you are you, and that our experiences and desires are valid – in the context of consenting adults. It’s a matter of consent. Acceptance. Freedom from shame. To be able to make authentic choices. Sexual positivity embraces the choice not to have sex.

Jackie rotman
new York
The millennial writer is the founder and CEO of the Center for Intimacy Justice, a non-profit organization focused on women’s sexual equality.

For the publisher:

I really enjoyed Michelle Goldberg’s column. This gave a perspective consistent with the experiences I witnessed in 2013 as an employee of Hanime nonprofit teen porn addiction recovery organization.

This younger generation is starting to realize how much porn has shaped their outlook on sex, and how unhealthy and out of touch those outlooks are. The one thing that I will never forget about the work I have done in this organization are the countless disturbing and heartbreaking stories of young people who have told how others – both adults and their peers – them. sexually assaulted them by putting on them the pornography they had just viewed. I have come to understand how harmful and misogynistic pornography can be.

Good for the young generation of today for having seen these misdeeds and for having denounced them. Their future will be better by doing so. I hope they will turn the tide for their own good and for the sake of women and girls around the world.

Heather cox
Eagle Mountain, Utah

For the publisher:

Michelle Goldberg’s column lacks a lot of what sexual positivity was. While some feminists have seen value (or at least potential) in porn, it was never a prerequisite for exploring ways to have the sex you wanted, without being tainted by power relations. , conventions, dramas or myths.

Sex-positive feminists argued that sex could be different things to the same people at different times: a loving language, a lonely pleasure, an erotic thrill, a form of play, an itch. And all of these possibilities were OK, as long as they weren’t secret; open and respectful negotiations and contracts between partners are essential.

I don’t think this view of sexual positivity is dead or dying. It’s just not very visible, because it’s hard work, and because most women have never identified as feminists or as HIV positive. Most have remained conventional and insecure, and most still worry about any non-judgmental sex ideology, especially polyamory.

Deborah J. Kayman
new York

For the publisher:

I take issue with Sara Clemence’s guest essay Opinion, “Let’s be better tourists” (nytimes.com, September 29).

First, given our busy social and political environment, how can she gleefully bring all Americans together for any sort of criticism? Second – and this underscores my first point – my experience does not reflect his.

My wife, I and another couple travel frequently to the UK and Europe, and I have yet to meet more than a handful of loud or rude Americans. I’m sure there are Yankees who behave as badly abroad as they do at home. But even calling them the majority sounds rude.

There is no doubt that Ms. Clémence behaves with Poppinse decorum while she rubs shoulders with fashionistas. But beyond his model, who to seek advice?

She and I must haunt different boroughs. I lost a lot of sleep on our last trip to Paris, and the thugs all night were screaming mostly French and Germans; I did not hear English. And when it comes to caring travel companions, I will prefer personal hygiene to everyday haute couture.

Ms. Clémence begins by lambasting the Americans for their behavior and ends up berating us for not meeting her standards for our routes. I will thank her for not teaching me how to lead my own trip.

While I share some of Ms. Clemence’s sentiments, I don’t like to be put in the same basket as all Americans and called “terrible tourists”.

Bob campbell
Noblesville, Ind.

For the publisher:

It is ludicrous to suggest that going in a group is a more locally sensitive way of traveling. Virtually all tour operators will take you exactly to the most touristic places, as that is what most people want and expect.

Tour groups bring crowds of people at a time rather than naturally spaced out. They make it practically impossible for a natural, personal and authentic interaction with a local. They also direct people to the already most touristy and cliché, and most culturally remote, shops, sites and restaurants in the local community.

Tour groups make their participants consumers of views and experiences, rather than providing authentic experiences.

Nick canfield
Brooklyn

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Sex, drugs and roller skates https://links2.info/sex-drugs-and-roller-skates/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://links2.info/sex-drugs-and-roller-skates/ Sex, drugs and roller skatesLocated in what had been a gigantic bowling alley at the dirty intersection of Santa Monica and La Cienega boulevards, the ice rink cost around $ 1 million in 1979 to build and decorate, money provided by Mr. Ross’s two business partners ( one of them, Denny Cordell, was the English record producer who started […]]]> Sex, drugs and roller skates

Located in what had been a gigantic bowling alley at the dirty intersection of Santa Monica and La Cienega boulevards, the ice rink cost around $ 1 million in 1979 to build and decorate, money provided by Mr. Ross’s two business partners ( one of them, Denny Cordell, was the English record producer who started Shelter Records augmented with a last minute infusion of Berry Gordy Jr., the founder of Motown. The ice rink was unlike anything else in town, its interiors being a continuous mural created by John Kosh, a graphic designer who throughout his career would design over 1,000 album covers, though none is more emblematic than a first effort: “Abbey Road” by The Beatles. “

“I wanted the place to have an old Hollywood feel,” Kosh said by phone from Los Angeles. “It was a Hanime magical cave with skaters spinning all over the place and crashing into each other. The floor of the rink was cast in dark blue polyurethane to give the impression that the skaters were touching the surface of a lagoon. I said, “Let’s go crazy and fly Carmen Mirandas bananas all over the ceiling.”

For the opening night, Mr. Ross imported 24 members of the Empire Roller Disco skate house team, a group whose movements on the floor were considered unmatched. They were resplendent in gold lamé, high-waisted stretchy pants, turbans and beaded braids and cornrows, Ms Ross said.

It was wonderful, amazing, unbeatable, Mr Ross recalled pointing out to a friend, who replied that it would only be downhill from there.

And that would, albeit for 36 months – roughly the same lifespan as another memorable club, Hanime – Flipper’s has made an indelible mark on the consciousness of regulars, entertained by a succession of surprises like a skater dressed in nothing but her stockings and quads, a Prince concert that featured the performer squirming on a purple bed in a thong or the regular Go-Go’s concerts, who performed on a stage at the middle of the rink.

“It was a great, great place,” said Nile Rodgers, the Grammy-winning musician and co-founder of Chic, by phone from London. Whenever he found himself in Los Angeles to perform or produce music for other artists, his nightly club tours invariably started at Flipper’s, where he often arrived on his own eight wheels.

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